31 Different Types Of Avocado Trees (Including Photos)

Avocados are probably one of the most popular foods in our lives right now. And with them being delicious and packing tons of nutritional value, who can blame us for being crazy for these little fruits?

They are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and essential fatty acids. They’re basically superfood!

There are many kinds of avocado trees available for pretty much every taste of these fruits imaginable, and each type has its own characteristics.

Here are just some of the different types of avocado trees available on the market right now!

Dwarf Avocado Tree

This type of tree grows up to 25 feet tall. Its fruit size is small.

Semi-Dwarf Avocado Tree

Semi-Dwarf Avocado Tree

This variety grows up to 30 feet tall. Its fruit is larger than the dwarf variety.

Standard Avocado Tree

Standard Avocado Tree

This kind of tree grows up to 40 feet tall. Its fruit sizes vary.

Tall Avocado Tree

Tall Avocado Tree

This plant grows up to 60 feet tall. Its fruit is large.

Giant Avocado Tree

Giant Avocado Tree

This tree grows up to 80 feet tall. Its fruit grows to 50 pounds.

Hass Avocado Tree

Hass Avocado Tree

Hass is the most popular variety of avocado trees in California. Widely considered to be one of the best overall avocado varieties, this cultivar grows up to 100 feet tall.

Fuerte Avocado Tree

Fuerte Avocado Tree

Fuerte is another popular variety of avocado trees. It grows up to 120 feet tall. Its fruit weighs up to 200 pounds.

Mexican Avocado Tree

Mexican Avocado Tree

Mexican is another popular variety of this tree that can be grown in quite cool climates. They also grow up as much as 130 feet tall!

Black Turtlehead Avocado Tree

Black Turtlehead Avocado Tree

Black turtlehead is yet another popular variety of avocado trees that are grown across the tropics. This tree grows up as much as 160 feet tall.

Yellow Pear Avocado Tree

Yellow pear is another popular variety of avocados. It grows up to 180 feet tall in some of the biggest examples!

Brown Turkey Avocado Tree

Brown turkey avocado trees are native to Central America and Mexico. They grow well in warm climates, such as Florida.

However, they are pretty tolerant to low levels of water in the areas they grow, making them popular in drought-prone places, and making great shade trees.

Turkey avocado trees produce fruit every year. You don’t need to prune them, fertilize them, or water them.

These trees do not require much maintenance. They grow quickly, they are hardy, and they are available in nurseries all across the country.

Naranjo Avocado Tree

Naranjo Avocado Tree

They thrive in warm climates with lots of sunshine and good soil. They’re popular in many home-growing communities for their easiness of growth.

Planting times vary depending on where you live, but you can plant these trees directly in the ground or use containerized plants to grow them from smaller saplings or cuttings.

Bacon Avocado Tree

Bacon Avocado Tree

Bacon avocado trees are gaining popularity among home gardeners. This is probably because they require minimal space, grow quickly, and produce delicious fruit.

They are much larger and have thicker skin than your regular avocado variety. They are similar to standard avocados, except they don’t ripen until after they’ve reached full size.

Almond Avocado Tree

Almond Avocado Tree

Almond is another popular variety of avocado tree. This is a huge variety of avocado, as it grows up to 250 feet tall. Its fruit typically weighs up to 2,500 pounds.

Ettinger Avocado Tree

Ettinger Avocado Tree

Ettinger avocado trees are one of the most popular varieties of avocados grown today. They produce delicious fruit that is much larger than the average fruit that grows from avocado trees.

Ettinger avocado trees are hardy and can survive in pretty cold temperatures, making them ideal for Colder climates such as New England and Canada.

Mexicola Avocado Tree

Another very popular cold-hardy avocado tree, and able to survive temperatures as low as 18 degrees Fahrenheit, Mexicola is probably one of the hardiest species out there! Although of course, like all avocado varieties, they prefer much warmer temperatures for the most part.

Mexicola avocado seeds germinate best in soil rich in organic matter. The seedlings require ample water until they reach about 3 inches tall, but once these plants reach 6 inches tall, they typically begin producing roots and will start to be able to provide themselves with nutrients

Jeanette Avocado Tree

Jeanette Avocado Tree

Jeanette avocados are a variety that goes best in warm, dryer areas, as they require moderate temperatures and little rainfall. They grow well in full sun areas such as the Southwest US.

They are also one of the most perishable and must be eaten within two days after harvest. For this reason, they don’t tend to be sold far from where they are cultivated.

Reed Avocado Tree

Reed Avocado Tree

Native to the regions of Central and South America, Reed avocados are drought tolerant and grow quickly in areas where summers are dry. However, reed avocado trees do require lots of water once established.

They full sun and plenty of water throughout the growing season. Plants grown in poor soil conditions tend to produce smaller fruit.

Serpa Avocado Tree

Serpa Avocado Tree

Serpa avocados are native to Brazil and Argentina. They are grown commercially across both California and Mexico and are one of the most popular tree nuts in the world.

Shirai Avocado Tree

Shirai Avocado Tree

 A variety well adapted to the heat of the tropics, Shirai avocado trees grows well in the heat and humidity of Florida.

The tree does not tolerate cold climates well at all but is one of the most productive cultivars out there when they are growing well. When grown well, they can produce fruit pretty much all year round!

Buttercup Avocado Tree

Buttercup Avocado Tree

Buttercup is another common variety of avocado trees. This tree grows up to 140 feet tall. They produce a ton of fruit when they are ready for picking., and generally have a sweet flavor to them.

Yamagata Avocado Tree

Yamagata avocados are a variant that is found on the islands of Hawaii and are best known for their long, almost pear-shaped bodies to their fruit. 

For the fruit to grow at its best, they have to be allowed to remain on the tree for the better part of a year, so they are certainly a fruit tree that needs patience!

Nishikawa Avocado Tree

Nishikawa Avocado Tree

Nishikawa avocado trees are well known for their beautiful orange fruit, making them pretty distinct from almost any other avocado cultivar, and are considered one of the most delicious avocados available. They are also very useful for many purposes.

They are not a very cold-resistant variant though, so need to be grown in warm areas with plenty of sunlight.

Ota Avocado Tree

Ota Avocado Tree

Ota avocado trees are one of the most popular fruit trees in California. They grow well in warm climates but must be kept cool during the winter months. Planting ota avocados requires knowledge about this tree’s unique characteristics, such as the tree requiring full sun exposure to grow properly.

It’s well worth it, however. Ota produces massive yields when harvesting season comes around!

Masami Avocado Tree

Masami Avocado Tree

Masami avocado trees are one of the most popular varieties of avocados out there. Known for its sweet taste and creamy texture.

They grow well in warm climates and can tolerate cold temperatures, and some of the fastest-growing avocado trees too. They can grow to maturity in as little as 2 years in some cases!

Nabal Avocado Tree

Nabal Avocado Tree

Natives of Mexico and wider Central America, the nabal avocado fruits have three distinct layers.

The inner layer consists of brownish skin which contains a white pulp surrounding the seed.

The middle layer is similar to that of a banana peel. This layer is thin and tough. It provides even more protection for the seed.

The outer layer that protects the fruit is thick and shiny.

Fukumitsu Avocado Tree

Fukumitsu Avocado Tree

Fukumitsu avocados are a highly prized Japanese fruit tree that produces delicious fruit year-round, loving the year-round warm climate that allows their fruit to grow.

Like other avocado variants, fukumitsu avocados are propagated via seeds, which can take around 7 days to germinate in ideal conditions.

Kosel Avocado Tree

Kosel Avocado Tree

Kosel avocado trees are native to Mexico, Central America, and South America. They grow easily in warm climates with dry summers. In colder areas where the water reaches freezing temperatures during winter, these plants will quickly die off.

The leaves of Kosel avocado trees are similar to other types of avocado leaves but are usually greener. The tree themselves grow up to five feet tall with thick woody trunks, making them more like bushes and shrubs than fully-fledged trees. Still, that doesn’t stop them from being great in guacamole!

Alpha Avocado Tree

Alpha Avocado Tree

A relatively new type of avocado cultivar, the trees of the Alpha Krome avocado tend to bloom around April. The tree will then produce fruit that can be picked in March of the following year.

Alphas, like other avocados, prefer moist soil that has good drainage, rather than being totally soaked when wet.

Kaneko Avocado Tree

Kaneko Avocado Tree

Kaneko trees thrive in tropical climates, where temperatures do not drop below freezing. It’s for this reason that they are found only around the tropics, outside isolated examples in greenhouses.

Illialu Avocado Tree

Illialu Avocado Tree

Grown and cultivated across the Philippines, illialu varieties of avocado are one of the most commonly grown avocados in Hawaii and California, due to their large size and ease of growing.

Conclusion

 So, there you have it! That’s quite a list of different kinds of just one fruit!

But, what’s even more surprising, is that there are even more types of avocado across the world.

If you’ve enjoyed learning about all the different types of avocado out there, why don’t you check out our other lists of varieties of plants, vegetables, and fruits?

Morgan Daniels

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