22 Lovely Black Flowers (With Pictures)

Flowers complete a garden. They can fill up empty space, create an atmosphere of wilderness, and not to mention the variety of colors that can brighten up even the dullest of backyard gardens. 

However, that doesn’t mean you have to opt for flowers in the most vivid colors. Sometimes, the most unique and breathtaking flowers are the ones that aren’t bright at all.

Black Flowers

Black flowers, for example, are a stunning way to add dimension to your garden with a hint of elegance and mystery. 

Interestingly, black is one of the rarest colors in flowers, and black flowers aren’t even black! Most of the time, “black” flowers are just really, really dark shades of purple. 

Whether you’re looking to add some rare flowers to your collection or if you’re wanting to expand your knowledge of flowers, here is our guide to 22 black flowers!

Black Pansy (Viola X Wittrockiana) 

Black pansy

Pansies happen to be one of the most popular garden flowers, but one of the lesser known varieties of the species is the black pansy.

Black pansies exhibit deep purple petals that appear like black velvet, providing dark blotches of ink amongst the flower bed. The bright yellow stamen provides a stark contrast, making the petals look even darker. 

Chocolate Cosmos (Cosmos Atrosanguineus) 

Chocolate cosmos (Cosmos atrosanguineus) 

Chocolate cosmos is a species of cosmos that is believed to be extinct in the wild, but they actually grow in abundance in their native soil in Mexico.

Interestingly, these flowers aren’t technically black – instead, the flowers are varying shades of reddish-brown that resemble chocolate, hence the name. 

Queen Of The Night Tulip (Tulipa ‘Queen Of The Night’) 

Queen of the night tulip

Tulips are another popular flower in gardens and flower arrangements, and the black variety – known as the queen of the night tulip – is particularly beautiful.

Featuring piercingly dark purple petals, queen of the night tulips are an excellent way to enhance the colors of surrounding flowers such as yellow tulips or pansies. 

Black Hollyhock (Alcea) 

Black Hollyhock (Alcea) 

With a genus of over 80 species, hollyhocks can come in a wide variety of shapes and colors – including a black variety.

Black hollyhocks boast deep purple petals that are often mistaken for being black, with some possessing hints of red only visible in sunlight.

With the ability to survive and thrive in most climates, black hollyhocks are easy to care for and provide a hint of elegance to any garden. 

Iris ‘Before The Storm’ 

Irises can be grown in virtually every color, including black. This particular black variety, known as ‘Before the storm’, features ruffled deep purple-black feathers that appear somewhat chaotic.

Despite the hints of purple, this is arguably the most pitch black flower you can find. 

Black Dahlia 

Black Dahlia 

While culturally associated with the 2006 film of the same name, the black dahlia is a lesser-known dahlia variety that provides an aura of grace and dignity.

Interestingly, these flowers are actually a deep shade of red or burgundy that appears almost black. 

Viola ‘Molly Sanderson’

Viola ‘Molly Sanderson’ is an excellent option for those who want to bring flowers into their homes, as it can be successfully grown in both indoor and outdoor settings.

These violas feature very dark purple petals, with a bright yellow stamen and lilac tones to add a stark contrast. They look particularly good amongst yellow violas. 

Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria Affinis) 

Chocolate lily

Native across the United States, the chocolate lily grows from a bulb and features deep brown (almost reddish) petals, hence the name of ‘chocolate lily’.

Despite their impressive appearance, the chocolate lily isn’t a favorite amongst some gardeners thanks to its arguably unpleasant scent and the fact flies pollinate the blooms rather than bees or butterflies. 

Bat Orchid (Coryanthes Speciosa) 

Bat Orchid (Coryanthes Speciosa) 

Found across Central and South America, the bat orchid is certainly one of the most unique black flowers on our list.

These flowers resemble a bat in flight, partly because of its deep purple (almost black) coloring. The bat orchid is also known as the ‘Cat’s whiskers’ or ‘Devil’s flower’. 

Purple Calla Lily 

Purple Calla Lily 

Calla lilies are one of the most popular flower species for bouquets thanks to their dramatic, tuberous and trumpet-shaped appearance.

Purple calla lilies are a dark purple variety of the calla lily, which provides an almost black flower amongst a flower bed or in a wedding bouquet. They certainly make a statement, that’s for sure! 

Black Baccara Rose (Rosa ‘Black Baccara’) 

Black Baccara Rose

Roses are undoubtedly one of the most popular and traditional flowers in the world.

The black baccara rose variety is a particularly stunning species, exhibiting the same rosette shape of a red rose but in a dark red coloring.

The green foliage helps to provide a stark contrast, making the flower appear darker. 

Black Widow Cranesbill Geranium (Geranium Phaeum) 

Black Widow Cranesbill Geranium (Geranium Phaeum) 

Also known as mourning widow, the black widow cranesbill geranium is a dark purple flower that often appears ebony black as it prefers to grow in damp, shaded areas.

The petals are distinctively crinkled at the edges and the foliage is covered in a brownish hue, making the whole flower appear dark and moody. 

Black Velvet Petunia 

Black Velvet Petunia 

As the name suggests, the black velvet petunia offers stunning velvet-like petals that appear almost entirely black thanks to a perfect formula by horticulturists.

These flowers were created in 2010 to provide elegance and dignity to a flower bed. They have since become a popular flower for their low-maintenance care requirements. 

Silver Laced Primrose (Primula) 

Silver Laced Primrose (Primula) 

While not an entirely black flower, the silver laced primrose is certainly one of the most unique flowers on our list.

This fascinating little primrose produces dark brown flowers with a bright yellow center and scalloped silver edges, creating a stark contrast against the almost black coloring. They tend to appear in spring at the edges of woodlands. 

Helleborus ‘Onyx Odyssey’ 

Helleborus ‘Onyx Odyssey’ 

Hellebores are one of the most popular winter garden flowers, and the ‘Onyx odyssey’ variation is no exception to this.

These dark burgundy flowers feature a black outer edge to each petal, making the flower look somewhat unrealistic and too perfect to be real. The creamy-white center also helps to provide a stark contrast. 

Green Wizard Coneflower (Rudbeckia Occidentalis)

Green Wizard Coneflower (Rudbeckia Occidentalis)

Also known as the western coneflower, the green wizard coneflower is a distinctive flower that features large oval flowers that are so dark purple they look almost black.

These flowers can grow up to 2 meters thanks to the sturdy and thick rhizome, and they are most commonly found in the meadows of northwestern United States. 

‘Dark Dimension’ Hyacinth 

Hyacinths are typically associated with spring thanks to their growth period and array of pastel colors, but the black variety is a unique take on the spring-blooming flower.

Known as the ‘dark dimension’ hyacinth, these flowers offer clusters of trumpet-shaped black blooms in the shape of an oval. This variety is known to be one of the most jet-black flowers out there. 

Penny Black Nemophila (Nemophila Menziesii ‘Penny black’) 

Penny Black Nemophila (Nemophila Menziesii ‘Penny black’) 

While technically a herb, nemophilas are a western North American-native plant that typically produces pale blue flowers.

The Penny black nemophila variety, however, produces small dark purple blooms that appear black thanks to the contrasting white center and outer edge. They are typically grown in a pot. 

Dahlia ‘Chat Noir’ 

Dahlia ‘Chat noir’ 

Another dahlia species, the dahlia ‘Chat noir’ is known for its distinctive velvet-textured pointed petals that exhibit a dark red or burgundy coloration.

While these flowers are typically considered red flowers, they can often appear blackish when the petals are particularly dark. 

Zwartkop Aeonium (Aeonium Arboreum ‘Zwartkop’)

Zwartkop Aeonium (Aeonium Arboreum ‘Zwartkop’)

While technically a succulent, the zwartkop aeonium is a stunning tall succulent that possesses a rosette of dark burgundy or reddish-brown leaves that appear black.

The dark colors are contrasted with the vibrant yellow center, making this a true standout feature  in warm climates. 

Midnight Poppy 

That’s right – not all poppies are bright red or yellow. The midnight poppy is a stunning variety that produces dark burgundy flowers on long, 30-inch stems.

These flowers provide an element of dimension in both height and color. Plus, unlike a lot of hybrids, midnight poppies can be purchased and grown from seeds! 

Lionheart Tango Lily 

Lionheart Tango Lily 

The lionheart tango lily is particularly astounding. These lilies possess large black (dark red or purple) petals with vibrant yellow tips to match the bright yellow center. They are intense eye-catching flowers that are bound to make any flower bed look instantly more interesting. 

Conclusion 

So, there you have it! While nature doesn’t actually provide us with true black flowers, the art of hybridization and careful breeding has led to an array of stunning flowers that appear almost black. 

Black flowers are very rare and carry their own individual meanings depending on the species, but in most cases, they offer an element of mystery, elegance, dignity, and grace to a garden.

Sometimes, black flowers can be used in an event bouquet (such as for a wedding or a funeral) depending on the color scheme or somber mood. 

Sure, no flower will ever be truly pitch black, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t an abundance of black flowers to choose from to enhance your garden!

Morgan Daniels