How To Propagate Philodendron: Things To Know

Philodendrons are stunning foliage plants that are a rich green in color. These plants are incredibly popular houseplants and do well indoors and in most climates.

From the family of Araceae, there are almost 500 different species of philodendron. This large family of plants are all flowering, and suffer little from pests.

Because of this, they are not only attractive additions to any home, but they are very attractive, as well.

Did you know that you can propagate a philodendron?

How to Propagate Philodendron

You can clone your favorite plant and make a whole army of them as long as you have a healthy mother plant!

If you want to learn more and find how you can do this, keep reading! Below, we are going to go through everything you need to know to successfully propagate these plants.

We will also go through everything you need to know in order to care for your baby plant. Ready to dive into it?

Propagating Philodendron

When you think of propagating, chances are philodendron isn’t the first thing that comes to mind.

The term propagation is most popularly associated with succulents like cacti, but you can propagate lots of different plants!

Philodendron can be propagated using the water or soil methods, but also via sphagnum moss, perlite, or leca.

The choice is up to you and your preferences, but all work well and will result in a healthy plant as long as you take care of them. 

Cuttings

The first thing you will need to do after deciding to propagate your favorite houseplant is take a cutting. You can use a sharp knife or any other kind of sharp blade to do this.

Use rubbing alcohol or something similar that will sterilize the blade you’re using. To get the best results and reduce the chance of bacterial problems, ensure that the blade is clean and sterilized.

If you don’t, your cutting might not make it.

Pick a spot on the mother plant where you want to take the cutting from, and make a clean incision. Make sure that the cutting has some leaves and nodes.

Two or three leaves is ideal, which will also speed up the process to get the plant growing. However, if you don’t want to ruin the leaves from the parent plant, you could get a cutting that only has nodes on it. 

Technically, you only need a stem cutting that is one inch long. It’s important to remember that if your cutting doesn’t have a node, no new plant will be able to grow.

The node ensures that a plant can grow. This method, known as node propagation, isn’t recommended unless you have a very rare plant that you don’t want to damage too much.

You have better chances of success using a stem cutting, leaves and all. Not to mention, it will be a lot faster.

Water Propagation Method

Water propagating is very easy and straightforward. All you really need to do is get your cutting, put it in water, and wait for roots to grow.

Using stem cuttings is much easier than node cuttings, but both can work. There is little you need to be concerned about with this method, since the cutting won’t be coming into contact with potting mix for a while yet.

This means that the chances of bacterial infections occurring are lower than the method we will outline below.

If you want to use this method to propagate your philodendron, follow the steps outlined below:

1) Get your philodendron cutting

2) Allow the cutting to sit out for up to three days so that the cut end callouses over. By allowing the cut end to callous, you will help the cutting protect itself from bacteria.

3) Prepare a glass of fresh water, or use another container. Only use clean, fresh water.

4) Position your cutting in the water so that the cut end is submerged.

5) Leave the cutting in the water.

6) Place the glass in a place that gets bright, indirect light. A warm spot is ideal as long as it isn’t in direct sun.

7) Change the water when it begins to look cloudy. You might want to change it daily or weekly.

8) Wait until the philodendron cutting grows roots. Once the cutting has roots that are between 1-2 inches long, it can be transferred and planted into a potting mix.

Soil Propagation Method

Soil propagation is also pretty easy, but might have a slightly lower success rate. Not to mention, you need to pay constant attention to it to ensure that the potting mix doesn’t dry out.

You don’t get the satisfaction of being able to see the roots grow, which a lot of people love.

If you are someone who doesn’t mind not being able to see the roots form, why not give the soil propagation method a try? 

If you want to use this method to propagate your philodendron, follow the steps outlined below:

1) Get your philodendron cutting

2) Allow the cutting to sit out for up to three days so that the cut end callouses over. By allowing the cut end to callous, you will help the cutting protect itself from bacteria.

3) Prepare your plant pot. Philodendrons do well in well-draining soil that is loose and high in organic matter.

4) You can dip the tip of your cutting in a root growth hormone to speed up the process, but this isn’t necessary.

5) Plant the cutting in the potting medium. At least one node should get covered.

6) Place the plant pot in a spot that gets bright, indirect sunlight. Keep it away from direct sun.

7) You might need to use a stake or something similar to help keep the cutting upright

8) Make sure that you keep an eye on the cutting and keep the potting medium moist, but not soggy, at all times. The roots will need to be established.

Sphagnum Moss, Perlite, Or Leca

Water or soil aren’t your only choices for propagating this plant. The first method could cause parts of your cutting to become soggy, while the second includes bacteria that could harm the plant.

This method is similar to the soil propagation method, but instead uses sphagnum moss, or another similar medium. 

If you want to use this method to propagate your philodendron, follow the steps outlined below:

1) Get your cutting from a healthy parent plant

2) Allow the cutting to sit out for up to three days to callous over

3) Prepare a plant pot with sphagnum moss and run water through it until it feels damp. The medium must not be dripping wet, only damp. 

4) Dip the tip of the philodendron cutting in a rooting hormone 

5) Wrap the damp moss around the bottom of your cutting

6) Place the cutting in a Ziploc bag. This will create its own mini-greenhouse and will help with the propagation process.

If you are using a node cutting, you can:

1) Get your cutting from a healthy parent plant

2) Allow the cutting to sit out for up to three days to callous over

3) Prepare a plant pot with sphagnum moss and run water through it until it feels damp. The medium must not be dripping wet, only damp. 

4) Dip the tip of the philodendron cutting in a rooting hormone 

5) Place the cutting on top of the damp moss

6) Place a heating mat beneath it

7) Spritz the cutting whenever it looks like it might be drying out

Repotting

Repotting your philodendron can be tricky, because it’s poisonous. Whenever you need to repot your plant, it’s always best to wear some gloves to protect yourself.

Avoid getting any plant sap on you, or else your skin will become very irritated. 

Since you will have to repot your plant numerous times throughout its life, you need to know how to do it properly. Thankfully, there isn’t a lot to it, and you don’t need to do anything special.

Just remember to use the correct potting medium, and size up the plant pot when it looks like it is beginning to outgrow its current one.

You should pick a plant pot that is 2-inches larger than the one that your plant is currently in.

Remember to check for any signs of disease when you are repotting your plant. There’s also a good chance that there will be a root ball in the pot, since all the roots will have been growing together for some time.

You will need to detangle roots as much as possible so that new ones can grow when the plant gets to its new home.

Philodendron Plant Care

Philodendron Plant Care

Although philodendrons are pretty forgiving plants, you should still strive to give them their perfect habitats.

If you want them to look their best, and grow into the stunning specimens they can be, keep in mind what they need. Below is everything you should consider when taking care of your philodendron.

Water

Like all plants, the philodendron needs constant watering. They require a generous amount of water every week in the spring and summer.

If you live in a dry climate, this plant would also benefit from being misted twice a week. If you already live in an area that has high humidity, your plant should already be perfectly happy.

When the colder months come around, you may only need to water your plant every 10 days or so. 

You should always allow the top inch of the soil to dry out between watering. If you give your plant too much water, you run the risk of subjecting it to root rot.

It is incredibly important to make sure that the plant pot your philodendron is in has drainage holes so that excess water can escape.

Using the correct, well-draining soil will also help your plant stay healthy.

Light

These plants love plenty of light. Partial sunlight is ideal for them, as they would naturally be in dappled sunlight.

Direct sun will damage the plant and its leaves, so avoid placing the plant in any areas that you know get strong light.

If you put your plant in a place where it doesn’t get enough light, you will soon realize as the growth will become leggy, and there will be a lot of space between its leaves.

Fertilizer

It’s best to fertilize your philodendron in the warmer months roughly once a month. The extra nutrients will help the plant as it is growing the most, compared to the winter.

When the seasons change, you should not fertilize your philodendron more than once every 6 weeks, though every 8 weeks is ideal. 

Generally, however, you should always take a look at the leaves on your plant. If you notice that your plant is growing and its newer leaves are considerably smaller than its older ones, you should fertilize it more.

Final Thoughts

Philodendrons are great plants to have around the house, as long as you don’t get any sap on you.

Remember to keep them away from pets and children, and they make the perfect housemate!

Their glossy leaves are on the same level of beauty as the well-loved monstera, and for good reason! It’s important to remember to take care of your plant, and it will always look its best. 

If you want to propagate your philodendron, what’s stopping you? These plants are great for propagating, and there is no reason why you wouldn’t love to have more around, right?

Frequently Asked Questions

What lighting conditions do philodendrons like?

Philodendrons like bright, indirect light. Dappled shade and sunlight is ideal, as this is what they would naturally get in nature.

Do Philodendrons Have Aerial Roots?

Yes, all philodendrons have aerial roots to help stabilize them.

What Is An Aerial Root?

Aerial roots are roots that are visible above the ground.

How Big Does A Piece Of Stem Need To Be For A Philodendron Cutting?

An inch long stem cutting will work for propagating a philodendron.

What Is A Vining Plant?

A vining plant is a plant that grows in vines and can climb objects like walls and ladders.

Is A Philodendron A Bushy Plant?

Some types of philodendron are bushy, such as the Philodendron Xanadu.

What Are Stem Cuttings?

Stem cuttings are pieces of stems that are taken off of the main plant. They are used to start new plants.

How Long Does The Rooting Process Take For Philodendron Propagation?

The rooting process for philodendrons can take anywhere from 2 to 4 weeks depending on how many times you replant.

What Is The Success Rate For Philodendron Propagation?

Propagation is usually successful, but there is not a 100% success rate.

Is A Philodendron A low-Maintenance Plant?

These plants are relatively low maintenance. 

How Big Do Philodendrons Get?

Some philodendrons can reach heights of up to 20 feet. However, most of these plants are smaller.

Do philodendrons Like Humid Climates?

Yes, philodendrons like humid climates. However, as long as you can spray them with water twice a week, they will do just fine in drier climates.

Morgan Daniels

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