20 Types Of Cute White Caterpillars – Identification Guides With Pictures

There is something mystical and magical about white caterpillars with their soft, and sometimes fuzzy, and hairy bodies. These exceptionally unique creatures go through a fascinating life cycle, reshaping their entire existence through multiple stages of metamorphosis until these creepy-crawlies reemerge as butterflies and moths.

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20 Types Of Cute White Caterpillars - Identification Guides With Pictures

Photo Credit White-marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar: This creepy-crawly can consume the entire leaf, leaving only the large veins behind.

There are several distinct types of white caterpillars, and they all have unique identifying features. Some are white only in a particular stage of their life cycle, while others are white throughout their caterpillar stage. Furthermore, some fuzzy white caterpillars have spines that can sting and cause skin irritation.

However, not all white caterpillars sting. Continue reading to find out!

Types Of White Caterpillars

Like all caterpillars, white caterpillars come from the insect order Lepidoptera. You can find many of these white caterpillars in various regions around the United States. Some have smooth bodies and identifiable markings, whereas others are hairy and have stings.

So, let’s look at some of these fantastic fuzzy creatures and their life cycles!

RELATED: 30 Types Of Yellow & Black Caterpillars With Pictures And Fun Facts

1. Fall Webworm Moth Caterpillar

Fall Webworm Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit These caterpillars vary highly in coloration, ranging from whitish-gray to pale yellow.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameHyphantria cunea
Other NamesThe fall webworm, white caterpillar, American webworm
Length (cm/inches)2.5-4 cm / 1-1.6 inches
Width (cm/inches)4-5 cm / 1.6-2 inches
Habitat/Food SourcesDeciduous trees and shrubs
DistributionFound in North America, Europe, and Asia
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous, but it can cause aesthetic damage.
Pest Status & DamageConsidered a pest due to the defoliation of trees and shrubs.

Description & Identification Guide

Native to North America, Fall Webworm Moth Caterpillar has become an invasive pest throughout Europe and Asia. Its larvae feed in huge nests and can completely defoliate trees and shrubs. It is a pest of several ornamental trees, shrubs, and crops.

One of their most identifiable features is their behavior. They build communal webs made of silk around the branches of their host plants. These webs can be up to two feet in diameter. Also, they have rows of black or brown spots running along their back.

2. Catalpa Sphinx Moth Caterpillar

Catalpa Sphinx Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit These are the only sphinx moth caterpillars that eat actively in the third and fourth instars.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameCeratomia catalpae
Other NamesCatalpa worm, Catawba worm
Length (cm/inches)8-10 cm / 3-4 inches
Width (cm/inches)1.5 cm / 0.6 inches (at widest point)
Habitat/Food SourcesCatalpa trees
DistributionFound in eastern North America
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageConsidered a pest due to defoliation of catalpa trees

Description & Identification Guide

The caterpillar is the larval stage of a native moth in the eastern United States. They only feed on catalpa trees. The Catalpa trees also appear to have a symbiotic relationship with them, as the trees don’t seem to be affected by complete defoliation at times.

Nevertheless, the Catalpa Sphinx Moth Caterpillar can be easily identified by its unique physical characteristics. These caterpillars have long, whitish bodies with several black spots, shiny black heads, and a distinctive horn at the rear end of their body.

3. Virginia Ctenucha Moth Caterpillar

Virginia Ctenucha Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit Even though it looks like it could be dangerous, Virginia Ctenucha Moth Caterpillar is harmless.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameCtenucha virginica
Other NamesVirginia ctenucha
Length (cm/inches)3.5-5 cm / 1.4-2 inches
Width (cm/inches)1-2 cm (0.4-0.8 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesMeadows, fields, and forest edges; feed on grasses and sedges
DistributionFound in eastern and central North America
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageNot considered a significant pest

Description & Identification Guide

The Virginia Ctenuchamoth caterpillar is an attractive creature that might make you pick it up and hug it. However, these caterpillars protect themselves when approached by curling up into a ball, revealing a black streak on their backside.

Furthermore, they are primarily active during the day and can often be seen resting on the plants they feed on. They also have a distinctive reddish head capsule and feet, and you can see black stripes and tufts of long black hair protruding from their body.

4. Hieroglyphic Moth Caterpillar

Hieroglyphic Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit These caterpillars are boldly patterned, warning their predators that they taste bad.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameDiphthera festiva
Other NamesHieroglyphic looper
Length (cm/inches)3-4 cm / 1.2-1.6 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesForests and woodlands; feed on the leaves of deciduous trees
DistributionFound in eastern North America
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageConsidered a minor pest due to occasional defoliation of trees

Description & Identification Guide

These boldly colored caterpillars can often be seen on a wide range of plant species and sometimes are considered pests of sweet potatoes, pecan, coconut palms, and soybeans. They feed at night, resting in a crevice or the soil of their food plant during the day.

Their distinguishing features include distinctive black and white markings on their head and legs, resembling ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics. Furthermore, their antennae, legs, and abdomen are all glossy black, giving them a bold and classy appearance.

5. Mullein Moth Caterpillar

Mullein Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit The caterpillars are generally visible from May to July and turn grey before hatching.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameCucullia verbasci
Other NamesMullein caterpillar, Verbascum caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)5-7 cm / 2-2.8 inches
Width (cm/inches)Mullein Moth Caterpillar
Habitat/Food SourcesMeadows, fields, and gardens; feed on leaves of mullein and other plants in the figwort family
DistributionFound in North America and Europe
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageConsidered a pest due to the defoliation of plants in the figwort family

Description & Identification Guide

The white, yellow, and black caterpillars of Mullein moths are among the most distinctive white caterpillars you will see on this list. They are easier to spot, as they feed out in the open, both during the day and at night. You will also more likely see the caterpillar than the moth as they crawl across the leaves and can be picked off by hand.

Nevertheless, they can be easily identified by their rounded white bodies with many small black dots and bright yellow patches. If you spot one of these caterpillars in the wild, you can also identify them with their five pairs of prolegs near the body’s end.

6. Domestic Silk Moth Caterpillar

Domestic Silk Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit The silkworm is the larva or caterpillar of a silk moth,  an economically important insect for silk production.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameBombyx mori
Other NamesDomesticated silk moth, silkworm
Length (cm/inches)5-6 cm / 2-2.4 inches
Width (cm/inches)3-4 cm (1.2-1.6 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesDomesticated; feed on the leaves of mulberry trees
DistributionDomesticated worldwide
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageThey are not considered a pest, as they are raised for the production of silk

Description & Identification Guide

There are over 500 types of silkworms. Still, only a few are used to produce silk, and Bombyx mori is one of them. They feed solely on the leaves of mulberry trees and produce a fine fiber used to make commercial silk. If the caterpillar is allowed to live after spinning its cocoon, it digests that cocoon with enzymes and emerges as an adult moth.

These caterpillars have a pale yellowish-white color with a few scattered black spots on its body. Furthermore, they have three pairs of true legs near the head and five pairs of false legs or prolegs with suction cups near the body’s end.

7. Little Metalmark Caterpillar

Little Metalmark Caterpillar

Photo Credit Even though they appear green if you look closely, they are stippled with many tiny white dots.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameCalephelis virginiensis
Other NamesLittle metalmark butterfly larva
Length (cm/inches)1 cm / 0.4 inches
Width (cm/inches)0.5-1 cm (0.2-0.4 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesPrairies, savannas, and grassy habitats; feed on the leaves of legumes
DistributionFound in eastern and central North America
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageThey are not considered a pest, as they do not cause significant damage

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars are present in the US from March through November, with up to five broods in a single year. Older caterpillars of this species chew a distinctive windowpane pattern in host leaves, and they are whitish-green, stippled with many tiny white dots.

The Little Metalmark Caterpillar is active during the day, and you can easily recognize it with its cylindrical body covered in fine, silky hairs that give them a fuzzy appearance. Also, when threatened, it curls up into a tight ball, using its spiky hairs for protection.

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8. Planthopper Parasite Moth Caterpillar

Planthopper Parasite Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit Unlike most other caterpillars that munch on leaves, these caterpillars gnaw on the flanks of cicadas.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameFulgoraecia exigua
Other NamesPlanthopper Parasite Moth Caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)1.2-1.5 cm / 0.5-0.6 inches
Width (cm/inches)2.2-2.5 cm / 0.9-1 inch
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in grasslands and open areas. Larvae feed on planthoppers
DistributionFound in Asia, including India, Thailand, and Vietnam
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageNot considered a pest, as it is a natural predator of planthoppers.

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars resemble the woolly bugs from The Ancient Magus’ Bride. When young, they look like ordinary grubs. However, they become covered with a fuzzy white coat of wax when they reach their final instar (the life stage just before changing into a pupa).

Furthermore, they have three pairs of true legs near the head and several false legs or prolegs. Also, a series of black spots and stripes run the length of their bodies. They can be seen on various plants, waiting for the planthopper to come close enough to attack.

9. Laugher Caterpillar

Laugher Caterpillar

Photo Credit The laugher caterpillar gets its name from its moth, which looks like a laughing man on its folded wings.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameLophocampa maculata
Other NamesMarbled prominent caterpillar, marbled tuffet caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)3-4 cm / 1.2-1.6 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFeed & live on deciduous trees such as oak, maple, and birch
DistributionFound throughout North America
Dangerous or Not?Can cause skin irritation if touched, as they have urticating hairs
Pest Status & DamageThey are considered a pest in some areas.

Description & Identification Guide

There is usually only one generation of these caterpillars annually in the northern US (two at most). They feed on the older, hardened leaves of oaks, birches, maples, elms, and other broadleaf trees that are usually too tough for other caterpillar species to consume.

These peculiar caterpillars have wispy long white hairs and squishy white bodies. However, the unique black-and-white patterns on their head set them apart from other caterpillars. In the final stage, their head becomes mostly black with creamy stripes before pupating.

10. Spotted Apatelodes Caterpillar

Spotted Apatelodes Caterpillar

Photo Credit Spotted Apatelodes Caterpillar has white, neon hair that becomes bright yellow as it matures.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameApatelodes torrefacta
Other NamesSpotted Apatelodes Caterpillar, Spiny Oakworm
Length (cm/inches)6-8 cm / 2.4-3.1 inches
Width (cm/inches)Spotted Apatelodes Caterpillar
Habitat/Food SourcesFeed & live on the leaves of trees such as oak, hickory, and walnut
DistributionFound in eastern North America
Dangerous or Not?Can cause skin irritation if touched, as they have spiny hairs
Pest Status & DamageConsidered a pest in some regions.

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars have red feet and legs, contrasting nicely with their white furry bodies. They also have short black spikes along their segments and long black lashes hanging behind their heads. As the caterpillars mature, the hairs turn into a dazzling neon yellow.

The head of the Spotted Apatelodes Caterpillar is small and black. Furthermore, it has distinctive yellow spots running the length of its body, which give it its name. Once it reaches its final instar, the caterpillar pupates on the ground, transforming into an adult moth.

11. Dalceridae Moth Caterpillar

Dalceridae Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit The translucent Dalceridae Moth Caterpillar looks more tasty, gummy, and sweet than a moth larva.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameAcraga coa
Other NamesJewel caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 2 cm / 0.8 inches
Width (cm/inches)N/A
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in rainforests; feed on lichens
DistributionFound in parts of Central and South America
Dangerous or Not?Not known to be dangerous to humans or animals.
Pest Status & DamageThey are not considered a pest, as their feeding does not harm plants. 

Description & Identification Guide

Dalceridae moth caterpillars remind me of nudibranchs, strikingly colored mollusks that can be best described as “trippy.” These caterpillars are creatures of such beauty that you might just want to hang them around your neck. Nevertheless, they are sticky for a reason.

Their stickiness protects them from becoming the food of hungry insects such as ants.

Some people think they look more like slugs, so they are often called “slug caterpillars” as well. Nevertheless, if you ever observe one of these caterpillars in the wild, take a moment to appreciate its delicate beauty and the vital role it plays in its environment.

12. American Dagger Moth Caterpillar

American Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit The American dagger moth caterpillar is not venomous, but its fine hair can still cause skin irritation.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameAcronicta americana
Other NamesAmerican dagger moth caterpillar, hairy caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)4-5 cm / 1.5-2 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFeed on the leaves of trees such as birch, oak, and maple
DistributionFound throughout eastern North America
Dangerous or Not?Can cause skin irritation if touched, as they have spiny hairs.
Pest Status & DamageTheir feeding can defoliate trees and impact forest health

Description & Identification Guide

The Dagger Moth Caterpillar has a unique way of defending itself. When it feels threatened, it will roll into a tight little ball, and its hair will stand, making it look like a miniature porcupine. However, despite looking spiky, you can notice that their hair is oddly silky to the touch.

Nevertheless, if you look closely, you will see that the Dagger Moth Caterpillar has a tiny black nose that is just adorable. It’s so small that you could easily miss it. The nose is surrounded by two black eyes that will seem to stare directly into your soul.

13. Virginian Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Virginian Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit On average, the Virginian Tiger moth caterpillar lives for about ten days unless they overwinter.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameSpilosoma virginica
Other NamesVirginian tiger moth caterpillar, woolly bear caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 5 cm / 2 inches
Width (cm/inches)1.5-2 cm (0.6-0.8 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in various habitats, including fields, meadows, and gardens.
DistributionFound throughout eastern North America, from Canada to Mexico
Dangerous or Not?Not known to be dangerous to humans or animals.
Pest Status & DamageNot considered a pest

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars show sexual dimorphism, with females slightly larger than males. Nevertheless, these caterpillars have a hairy appearance, primarily yellow and white, and sometimes they are also sparsely covered in tufts of black hairs.

Once they reach their full size, they will burrow underground to overwinter and emerge as the Virginian Tiger Moth. You can also identify them with their unique feeding habit. They “skeletonize” leaves and eat all leaf tissue except the large veins.

14. Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit These caterpillars have yellow-orange heads and bodies covered with fluffy white hair.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameHalysidota harrisii
Other NamesSycamore tussock moth caterpillar, white-marked tussock moth caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 4 cm / 1.5 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFeed on the leaves of trees such as sycamore, maple, and oak
DistributionFound throughout eastern North America
Dangerous or Not?Can cause skin irritation if touched, as they have spiny hairs
Pest Status & DamageConsidered a pest in some areas.

Description & Identification Guide

Although these caterpillars do not sting, you should not handle them as their hairs can cause skin irritation, itching, and rashes. And other than their hair, these caterpillars have additional two to four pencil-like orange chunks of hair near their head. Furthermore, the caterpillar also has two long pencil-like hairs protruding from both ends of its body.

Nevertheless, the fully grown, hairy caterpillars are usually seen in late summer and early Autumn when they are about to pupate. They pupate in late June and July and emerge as Sycamore Tussock Moths in July and August.

15. Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit Hickory tussock moth caterpillars have one generation per year and are commonly encountered in the fall.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameLophocampa caryae
Other NamesHickory tussock moth caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 4 cm / 1.5 inches
Width (cm/inches)1.5-2 cm (0.6-0.8 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in deciduous forests
DistributionFound throughout eastern North America
Dangerous or Not?It can cause skin irritation if touched, as they have spiny hairs
Pest Status & DamageIt is considered a pest in some places.

Description & Identification Guide

Hickory tussock moth caterpillars are fuzzy, white creatures often appearing in the fall. Their hairs can irritate the skin, but there are no known cases of allergic reactions. Nevertheless, they feed on hardwood trees, including hickory, walnut, hornbeam, elm, and willow. However, their preferred hosts are birch, aspen, and black locust.

If you look closely, you can also see long black hairs sticking out from areas near the front and back of the caterpillar. The caterpillars eventually turn into rusty-brown moths.

16. White-marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

White-marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit These caterpillars can skeletonize entire leaves, while older larvae eat everything except the prominent veins.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameOrgyia leucostigma
Other NamesWhite-marked tussock moth caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 4 cm / 1.5 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and gardens
DistributionFound throughout North America, from Canada to Mexico
Dangerous or Not?Can cause skin irritation if touched, as they have spiny hairs.
Pest Status & DamageThey can cause a nuisance by dropping from trees onto cars and pedestrians.

Description & Identification Guide

These distinctive-looking caterpillars are known to feed on plants belonging to 116 genera. And trees under stress or newly planted suffer the most damage. After feeding for several weeks, they spin grayish cocoons, inside of which they pupate and emerge as moths.

Nevertheless, you can quickly identify them with the two hair “pencils” of black setae extending beyond the head. Furthermore, they have four brush-like tufts or bunches of light tan white hairs on the back, giving them their odd (White-marked) name.

17. Fall Webworm Caterpillar

Fall Webworm Caterpillar

Photo Credit These caterpillars overwinter in giant silk cocoons and transform into an adult in the spring.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameHyphantria cunea
Other NamesFall webworm caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 4 cm / 1.5 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-4 cm (0.8-1.6 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in a variety of habitats
DistributionFound throughout North America, from Canada to Mexico
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous
Pest Status & DamageConsidered pest

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars have pale yellow or white bodies with a few black spots on the back. You can also see long tufts of silky grey hairs emerge from their bodies. There are also two types of these caterpillars: the red-headed fall webworm caterpillar and the black-headed.

The red-headed are tan and emerge from a double layer of eggs. In contrast, the black-headed caterpillars have a lighter body color and arise from a single layer of eggs.

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18. Figwort Sawfly Caterpillar

Figwort Sawfly Caterpillar

Photo Credit These caterpillars feed on Figwort plants and are typically seen in August and September.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameEndelomyia aethiops
Other NamesFigwort sawfly caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 2.5 cm / 1-inch
Width (cm/inches)1 cm (0.4 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound on figwort and snapdragon plants
DistributionFound in Europe and North America
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous to humans or animals.
Pest Status & DamageThey can cause the defoliation of figwort and snapdragon plants

Description & Identification Guide

These large white and black-dotted caterpillars turn into Figwort sawflies. The Figwort sawfly wasp hunts white. In contrast, the caterpillar itself eats plants of the Figwort family. You can quickly identify them by counting their legs; however, it could be problematic in tiny larvae.

Nevertheless, they have three true legs at the front but have more ‘stumpy’ prolegs, five or more, near the abdomen. Lastly, the caterpillar also has a crinkled appearance.

19. Black-Waved Flannel Moth Caterpillar

Black-Waved Flannel Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit Even though these caterpillars look like they welcome touch, you must resist the temptation.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameLagoa crispata
Other NamesBlack-waved flannel moth caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 3.8 cm / 1.5 inches
Width (cm/inches)2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in tropical and subtropical regions on a variety of host plants
DistributionFound in parts of Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean
Dangerous or Not?They can cause painful stings and allergic reactions if touched.
Pest Status & DamageThey can defoliate trees and impact crop yields

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars are called Black-waved Flannel Moth caterpillars because when they mature into a moth, the moth has lines of black crimped hairs on creamy wings. These caterpillars differ from the caterpillars of all other butterflies and moths by their number of prolegs. They have seven prolegs, while all other caterpillars have five or fewer pairs.

And as already said, these caterpillars can sting. Reactions to the stings vary depending on the life stage of the caterpillar and a person’s sensitivity to the sting.

20. Edwards’ Wasp Moth Caterpillar

Edwards' Wasp Moth Caterpillar

Photo Credit Even though they look adorable and harmless, these caterpillars are destructive to Ficus trees.

Quick Facts

Scientific NameHorama edwardsii
Other NamesEdwards’ wasp moth caterpillar
Length (cm/inches)Up to 4 cm / 1.5 inches
Width (cm/inches)1-2 cm (0.4-0.8 inches)
Habitat/Food SourcesFound in North and Central America
DistributionFound in North and Central America, from Canada to Mexico
Dangerous or Not?Not dangerous to humans or animals.
Pest Status & DamageThey are a natural predator of other pest insects.

Description & Identification Guide

These caterpillars can defoliate tree leaves when their numbers are high, potentially even killing trees. Ficus trees in Florida are often considerably impacted by Edwards’ Wasp moth caterpillar. And even though they appear white, when fully grown, the caterpillars are pale yellow with a reddish/orange and white head and four white stripes on the back.

The caterpillars feed on leaf margins or create irregular holes in the leaves. Once they reach their full size, they pupate for a few weeks and emerge as moth wasps.

Final Thoughts

There you have it! A list of some of the most adorable white caterpillars in the US.

And even though these caterpillars look harmless and do not actively attack pets and people, it is better to keep your distance unless you are sure about their safety. Some of these cute creatures hide venomous stings under their fluffy white coats.

Even brushing against their hair is sometimes more than enough to trigger an allergic reaction in people. So, keep your distance and know your caterpillars!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Is there such a thing as a white caterpillar?

There are several different white caterpillars, all with unique identifying traits. Primarily, they are the larvae of various moth and butterfly species. However, some wasps also have white larvae that look like caterpillars. The domestic silk moth caterpillar is also white.

What is the most common caterpillar?

The painted lady butterfly is likely the most common butterfly caterpillar in the world. It is found on nearly every continent. However, some people argue that armyworms are the most common caterpillars, and still others give this credit to cabbageworm caterpillars.

Can a caterpillar give you a rash?

Many caterpillars have hairs or spines which are connected to venomous glands. These tiny hairs are called setae, and they are what can cause a rash. Depending on the species and individual, reactions range from mildly itchy to moderately extreme inflammation.

How do you treat hairy caterpillar rash at home?

To treat a rash caused by caterpillar stings, you can use ice packs, analgesics, creams, antihistamines, and lotions with steroids. They reduce inflammation in no time. However, if there is a severe allergic reaction, you should immediately seek medical help.

What caterpillar turns into a white butterfly?

The Imported Cabbage worm, also known as the white cabbage caterpillar, turns into a white butterfly. They feed on cabbages and other plants found in vegetable gardens.

Do you know of other variety of white caterpillars? Let us know in the comment section below. Also, check out our other articles:

Potato Bug 101: Potato bug bites! And everything else that you’d like to know!

All About Worm Castings and Their Benefits to Plants & Soil!

10+ Natural Pest Control for Houseplants to Protect Them from Insects and Diseases

Morgan Daniels

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